Unlikely Dance continues, as my process evolves

Beethoven Oaks (finished underpainting)
Beethoven Oaks (finished underpainting) – 30 x 48 in., oils on canvas

I’ve got a good start on the next Unlikely Dance piece — the fourth in the series — which I’m provisionally titling Beethoven Oaks. The setting is a Binghamton park variously called “Recreation Park,” “Rec Park,” and “Beethoven Park” (because Beethoven Street runs alongside it); the dancers are sourced from a photoshoot I did in Gilbertsville NY last month. Once again, the dance is in incorrect formation, but I crossed that line again in favor of a lively composition, and I’m quite happy with both the design and the underpainting. It’s been a values-based battle so far, as the lights and darks are complicated in places where they intersect and contrast. The color block-in should be interesting!

Also interesting, to me anyway, is my evolving process of putting these pieces together. For one thing, I’ve changed my palette, in both physical shape and content. I covered the physical part in an earlier post — still figuring out how to best use it, but I really like it.

My current palette, clockwise from left: titanium white, cadmium yellow light, cadmium yellow medium, cadmium red, alizarin crimson, cobalt violet, ultramarine blue, cobalt blue, viridian, sap green, burnt umber, burnt sienna, raw sienna
My current palette, clockwise from left: titanium white, cadmium yellow light, cadmium yellow medium, cadmium red, alizarin crimson, cobalt violet, ultramarine blue, cobalt blue, viridian, sap green, burnt umber, burnt sienna, raw sienna

But I’ve also, with the last painting, Unlikely Dance: Entry Hall, added a couple of colors to my limited palette. Influenced by instructional videos from Sharon Sprung, Brian Keeler, and Rose Frantzen, I’ve added cobalt blue and raw sienna (a yellowish brown)… and what a difference they’ve made! Sprung is so right when she says that cobalt blue is not only a beautiful color, but “plays well with others” — so much better in the mix than ultramarine blue. And raw sienna adds so much to depth to fleshtones. I’m not giving up ultramarine (a deep, rich blue which makes a really delicious black, mixed with burnt umber), but I am going to back off on my experiments with yellow ochre; it’s very similar in its pure appearance to raw sienna, but unlike raw sienna it seems to go flat when mixed. In the painting of the piece, I notice I’m becoming more methodical, reducing the intimidation factor: starting with the middle third of the canvas, sitting on my high painting stool, standing as needed to concurrently work the top. Then I move to my low painting stool, to get the area directly below the middle, and finally move to a low chair for the bottom — sometimes even a little paint crate to get right to the very bottom. From each position I frequently stand and back off for the larger view. Rose Frantzen’s intriguing idea of using a large mirror behind me for a quick turn-around doubling of distance from the painting is one I’m intending to try, as well.

The “Unlikely Dance” project was made possible by a grant from the Artists Fund of the Community Foundation for South Central New York

To follow my progress in Unlikely Dance, just click on the “Unlikely Dance” link under TOPICS, on the left of any page in this blog.

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